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Hub-In-A-Box Grants Awarded!

Congratulations to the 15 groups who were awarded funds to establish a hub location in their neighborhoods.  These funds were secured by the Seattle City Council, and are managed through the Department of Neighborhoods with assistance from the Office of Emergency Management and Parks and Recreation Department.  The hubs are in the process of receiving their boxes and equipment, so if one of these is in your area, watch for announcements about future training and connecting activities. As each completes their set up, they will also be added to our interactive NeighborLink Map, so you can also reach out to them as well.

 

 

No Power, No Bars Field Exercise –

photo album to tell the story

Our 2018 spring field exercise became the setting for the scenario we all dread, a disaster happening on a cold and rainy day. But that was a good thing, we tested how our field set up did against the elements.  We also discovered that huddling under tents improves communications, helps with self-heating and makes us wish we had more sidewalls.  In all, it was a very successful drill; our communications with the city ACS team worked very well, they showed us the future of radio communications using digital devices. We had several new hubs out for their first drill and are documenting lessons learned from them and other hubs to share for improvement.  We didn’t have as much community participation in the form of citizen actors or pass by traffic, but that might have been expected due to the weather.  Here is a link to our photo album of participating hubs and ACS personnel.  Enjoy and we’ll publish our After Action Review when everything is compiled.

 

2018 Hub Field Exercise Coming Up!

 

 Hub-In-A-Box Grants Now Available

Thanks to the support of Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez and with the assistance of the Department of Neighborhoods, Parks and Office of Emergency Management, the 2018 Hub-in-A-Box Grant program is now open.

This program is offering up to $21,600 in funding to support Community Emergency Hubs throughout the city.  This is enough to provide 14 groups with up to $1,500 to create their own Hub-in-a-Box.

A Hub-in-a-Box contains the essential materials and supplies your community would need in case of a disaster where help from the City or others is delayed or disrupted. They must be contained within a durable and secured storage box that is in a publicly accessible location.

What is a Community Emergency Hub?

If you are interested in applying for a Hub-in-a-Box for your community, please complete the 2018 Hub in a Box Application, along with the Material Request Application.

Check out our tip sheet for information that can help guide new community hubs through the process of purchasing and installing a Hub-in-a-Box.

Completed applications must be submitted no later than 5:00 p.m. PST on Friday, April 13th, 2018. Applications can be submitted via email or in person to the address below. Please note, applications cannot be mailed in to the Office of Emergency Management or the Department of Neighborhoods.

Please drop off applications in person to Tim Wolfe, Community Investments Division Director, at:

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods 600 4th Ave, Floor 4 Seattle, WA 98104

Or submit via email to: DON_Grants@seattle.gov

 

2018 begins with training and new activities

It was nice to have a holiday break to wind up 2017 and now we begin our planning for an active 2018.  Already there are events planned for February (see our calendar) and our full city drill date has been set for Saturday, April 28.  Please see our latest newsletter for all the details.  We also include our 2017 summary report of activities as part of the newsletter, and we hope you can join us for more of the same in 2018.

 

Our Fall 2017 Newsletter is out

Please click here to read our highlights for the fall, reflections on recent disasters and learn more about how you can train and get better prepared to help yourself, your family and your neighbors in a disaster.

 

Hubs win honorable mention

from FEMA

The Hub in a Box program was awarded a national Honorable Mention from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the category of Technology Innovation. Funded by the Seattle City Council at our request, the Hub in a Box program provides a small amount of money to directly purchase basic equipment that a hub uses to help a neighborhood level response after a disaster. This will allow neighbors to help neighbors while the city is coordinating the larger, city wide response.  We were awarded $18,000 in 2016 and were able to provide equipment for 11 hub locations throughout the city, with an emphasis in neighborhoods that typically don’t have the money to front costs, as is typically done with the city’s existing Neighborhood Matching Fund program.

 

Hub and ACS drill – July 29, 2017 – Cascadia Rising II – Hubs and Spokes

Several hundred volunteers and neighbors joined together to practice in our last drill.  It was a wonderful turn out and great practice session for the hubs.  The 11 hubs who participated this year ranged from well-seasoned locations to several practicing for the first time.  We had several specific objectives to work on this year, ranging from improving the flow of information through the hubs, testing our new Universal Graphics Communications Card and informational signs to managing a heavy radio traffic load.  We are in the process of collecting feedback of successes and improvements, but everyone reports that the volunteers all learned something new and the spontaneous volunteers who step forward to help were fabulous!  We thank everyone who helped make this drill possible, including our partners at the Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS)

Here is the  media coverage from the drill and in the week prior, and pictures from some of the hubs we’ve received so far.  KOMO and Q-13 Fox also stopped by, but we haven’t seen anything posted yet.

 

 

 

 

Alaska Junction Hub, any surface will do!

Alaska Junction Hub, any surface will do!

Alaska Junction Hub organizing at start of drill

Alaska Junction Hub organizing at start of drill

Alaska Junction Hub message pocket board

Alaska Junction Hub message pocket board

Broadview Hub messaging tents

Broadview Hub messaging tents

Broadview Hub crew

Broadview Hub crew

Broadview Hub visitors check out the Needs board

Broadview Hub visitors check out the Needs board

High Point Hub Radio Operator and volunteers

High Point Hub Radio Operator and volunteers

High Point Hub Greeters

High Point Hub Greeters with a young citizen actor

High Point Hub message takers

High Point Hub message takers and citizen actor

 

Hubs in Seattle P-Patch Gardens

This month, the Office of Emergency Management and Department of Neighborhoods announced that the concept of community based hubs is expanding to include the P-Patch Gardens in the City of Seattle.

 

“The Seattle Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is partnering with the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program to designate all P-Patch Gardens as gathering places during an emergency (Community Emergency Hubs).

 

Community Emergency Hubs are places where people gather after a disaster to help each other. Hubs serve as a central gathering place among neighbors in homes, apartments, and condominiums. They include spaces like the P-Patches, which are already natural gathering places. With the addition of the P-Patches, it means neighbors and community members now have about 150 pre-determined places in the City of Seattle to meet after disaster.

 

How do I find out where the hubs are?

The Seattle Office of Emergency Management (OEM) maintains a map of hub sites. There is also an independent, interactive Seattle Emergency NeighborLink Map where community members can connect with each other.”

 

The press release continues with some frequently asked questions about the P-Patch hubs as gathering places, you can read the full release here

 

We welcome the addition of additional community gathering places and hope the P-Patch gardeners will join us in practicing what to do should a major disaster happen in Seattle!

 

 

Looking forward to 2017 –
Plans underway for a busy year!

 

We accomplished a lot in 2016, especial with the additional of 8 hubs and our Cascadia Rising drill. The Hub Captains are thinking about what will be the most beneficial activities and we have a great list going.  Stay tuned for more details about the following.

Be sure and check our Calendar and sign up for our Newsletter to find events you want to attend.

Disaster Relief Trials Bike Drill
Alki Summer Greenways

Imagine the impact a nearby 8.5 magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami would have on Seattle. Buildings collapsed, roads in shambles, people displaced, services disconnected. Without roads that are passable to vehicles, how do we provide essential services to injured and scared residents?

The Disaster Relief Trials is a fun, emergency preparedness event which mobilizes bicyclists to carry cargo representing emergency supplies to and from checkpoints, and this year, we had hub locations in West Seattle participating.  Check out our video from the Morgan Junction Hub!

 

 

New video of Hubs in Action!

If you haven’t been able to be at a hub during one of our drills, here’s a look at what hub volunteers and doing and thinking as they prepare to help their communities. This was filmed during our June, 2016 Cascadia Rising drill at the Lake City Hub, so you get to see some experienced people in action.

This video was created by Bill Aston, who is a professional videographer and who graciously donated his time and talent to do this. He is passionate about people learning about preparedness and the importance of taking action, and we thank him for this gift.

Hubs continue to grow

Several new hubs have either signed up or are in the process of getting established.   New this month are Hubs in Victory Heights and Eastlake, and watch for additions in Ravenna Bryant and University Heights.  We’ve also had some additional SNAP groups put themselves on the map as well; don’t forget to pass the word to your local SNAP group who might not yet be on the map.

Successful Cascadia Rising
Seattle Emergency Hub Drills

King 5 News coverage of the Rainier Beach Emergency Hub Drill

Komo News coverage of the Queen Anne and Magnolia Emergency Hub Drill

West Seattle Blog coverage of the High Point Hub Drill

2015 Year in Review for the Hubs

Drills, training, outreach tables, presentations; the Seattle Emergency Communications Hubs had a busy year!  We end the year with 51 hubs on the map and about 10 more in the process of getting organized.  Many of the individual hubs held special events and training and we made some great new partnerships.  Please see our Hubs 2015 Year In Review Newsletter Edition for all the details and pictures to boot.

City of Seattle Releases New Tool
Seattle Hazard Explorer

The Seattle Office of Emergency Management website now features and series of interactive maps that highlight some of the city’s top hazards. Check out the Seattle Hazard Explorer and learn more about the hazards that impact Seattle. You can zoom in on your home, work place, or any other location to see what hazards are most likely to impact you. Information videos and other content provide more in depth explanations of each of the hazards. Make sure you look out for links to important preparedness information as well! You can access the Seattle Hazard Explorer here: View the Seattle Hazard Explorer
You can also access the Seattle Hazards Explorer by going to the “Hazards” section of the Office of Emergency Management website.

Western Washington 4.8 magnitude earthquake!

The strongest earthquake in the region for over a decade hit the Vancouver area on December 30th, 2015. This event has raised concerns with many Puget Sound residents about whether or not they are prepared for a disaster.
So what do you need to put in an “emergency kit” to keep in your car, office and your home to prepare yourself for the worst scenario? Do you have a plan of communication worked out with your family and the children? If the roads were closed and fire or medical services were unable to reach you, what are your options? Lucky for us we live in Seattle and our local government and individual resident volunteers are already gearing up to save lives and make a disaster in our city and neighborhoods more survivable.
Komo News covered the steps for Earthquake and Emergency Preparedness they interviewed the Seattle Emergency Hub Captains, Cindi Barker and Karen Berge, about their Volunteer activities as well as the Pacific Northwest Seismic Center.
The Seattle Emergency Hubs organization is a volunteer group of residents who practice emergency drills and training exercises on a regular basis. They coordinate these activities with other volunteer groups such as SNAP, CERT, Block Watch and ACS as well as City Management and Emergency services.

 

The Pacific Northwest Seismic Center had the perfect opportunity to test out their new equipment with this latest quake. They hope to have a mobile app ready soon so that residents can be alerted of future quake activity. Even so much as a 20 second alert can save lives.

 

How to prepare for emergency scenarios

Seattle Emergency Management Preparedness
Seismic Scenario Seattle
WA State Seismic Hazard Catalog

Hubs at Multiple Community Events This Summer

Hubs at multiple community events this summer Want to connect with your local hub and hub captain? Watch our calendar for information about which community festivals and events we will be at with information tables.  We really want to meet people who are interested in community and personal preparedness; we learn best from each other […]

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Posted by admin in Announcements

Why we do field exercises

It’s a lot of work to do a hub practice session, getting out the field and practicing for a disaster.  There’s time spent creating the scenario and exercise design itself, and there’s a huge investment of people time and energy on the day of the exercise.  Why do we bother? Well, because we think muscle […]

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Posted by admin in Announcements

Disaster Skills Training – in Vietnamese

Kudos to the Seattle Office of Emergency Management for offering disaster preparedness training classes in multiple languages.  In March, they taught a Disaster Skills class in Cantonese and in April one will be offered in Vietnamese at the High Point Library.  FEMA has advocated for a “whole community” approach to disaster preparedness and engaging the […]

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Posted by admin in Announcements, Uncategorized